• the bae: love me more
  • me: that's impossible
  • the bae: why's that?
  • me: you're not Link
thatseanguyblogs:

danger:

turkeytree:

merasmus:

stone cold

this kind of shit gets you thinkin 
what if she was walking 0.001 mph slower than she was
what if she took 2 seconds longer in the shower that morning
what if she woke up 2 seconds later than she actually did
she woulda been roadkill brah

zayyummm

I love how she barely jumps, like, “WHAT THE… oh. It’s just another tree. whatev.” and then proceeds to carry on herping the derp.HOW MANY TREES HAVE TRIED TO KILL YOU, LADY!?

thatseanguyblogs:

danger:

turkeytree:

merasmus:

stone cold

this kind of shit gets you thinkin 

what if she was walking 0.001 mph slower than she was

what if she took 2 seconds longer in the shower that morning

what if she woke up 2 seconds later than she actually did

she woulda been roadkill brah

zayyummm

I love how she barely jumps, like, “WHAT THE… oh. It’s just another tree. whatev.” and then proceeds to carry on herping the derp.

HOW MANY TREES HAVE TRIED TO KILL YOU, LADY!?

Anonymous asked:

What is 50 shades of grey about? And what's so bad about it?

middleclassreject:

dysonrules:

aconissa:

50 Shades of Grey was originally fanfiction based on the Twilight series, which was then published as a novel (along with 2 subsequent books). It sold over 100 million copies around the world and topped best-seller lists everywhere. It’s about to be adapted into a film, set to come out early next year.

It follows a college student named Ana Steele, who enters a relationship with a man named Christian Grey and is then introduced to a bastardised and abusive parody of BDSM culture.

While the book is paraded as erotica, the relationship between Ana and Christian is far from healthy. The core mantra of the BDSM community is “safe, sane and consensual”, and 50 Shades is anything but. None of the rules of BDSM practices (which are put in place to protect those involved) are actually upheld. Christian is controlling, manipulative, abusive, takes complete advantage of Ana, ignores safe-words, ignores consent, keeps her uneducated about the sexual practices they’re taking part in, and a multitude of other terrible things. Their relationship is completely sickening and unhealthy.

Basically, “the book is a glaring glamorisation of violence against women,” as Amy Bonomi so perfectly put it. 

It’s terrible enough that a book like this has been absorbed by people worldwide. Now, we have a film that is expected to be a huge box-office success, and will likely convince countless more young women that it’s okay not to have any autonomy in a relationship, that a man is allowed to control them entirely. It will also show many young men that women are theirs to play with and dominate, thus contributing to antiquated patriarchal values and rape culture.

REBLOG FOREVER.

Boycott this fucking movie, for the love of god. These kinds of ideas are dangerous and set us back as a society 

A DIALOGUE WITH SARAH, AGED 3: IN WHICH IT IS SHOWN THAT IF YOUR DAD IS A CHEMISTRY PROFESSOR, ASKING “WHY” CAN BE DANGEROUS

  • SARAH: Daddy, were you in the shower?
  • DAD: Yes, I was in the shower.
  • SARAH: Why?
  • DAD: I was dirty. The shower gets me clean.
  • SARAH: Why?
  • DAD: Why does the shower get me clean?
  • SARAH: Yes.
  • DAD: Because the water washes the dirt away when I use soap.
  • SARAH: Why?
  • DAD: Why do I use soap?
  • SARAH: Yes.
  • DAD: Because the soap grabs the dirt and lets the water wash it off.
  • SARAH: Why?
  • DAD: Why does the soap grab the dirt?
  • SARAH: Yes.
  • DAD: Because soap is a surfactant.
  • SARAH: Why?
  • DAD: Why is soap a surfactant?
  • SARAH: Yes.
  • DAD: That is an EXCELLENT question. Soap is a surfactant because it forms water-soluble micelles that trap the otherwise insoluble dirt and oil particles.
  • SARAH: Why?
  • DAD: Why does soap form micelles?
  • SARAH: Yes.
  • DAD: Soap molecules are long chains with a polar, hydrophilic head and a non-polar, hydrophobic tail. Can you say ‘hydrophilic’?
  • SARAH: Aidrofawwic
  • DAD: And can you say ‘hydrophobic’?
  • SARAH: Aidrofawwic
  • DAD: Excellent! The word ‘hydrophobic’ means that it avoids water.
  • SARAH: Why?
  • DAD: Why does it mean that?
  • SARAH: Yes.
  • DAD: It’s Greek! ‘Hydro’ means water and ‘phobic’ means ‘fear of’. ‘Phobos’ is fear. So ‘hydrophobic’ means ‘afraid of water’.
  • SARAH: Like a monster?
  • DAD: You mean, like being afraid of a monster?
  • SARAH: Yes.
  • DAD: A scary monster, sure. If you were afraid of a monster, a Greek person would say you were gorgophobic.
  • (pause)
  • SARAH: (rolls her eyes) I thought we were talking about soap.
  • DAD: We are talking about soap.
  • (longish pause)
  • SARAH: Why?
  • DAD: Why do the molecules have a hydrophilic head and a hydrophobic tail?
  • SARAH: Yes.
  • DAD: Because the C-O bonds in the head are highly polar, and the C-H bonds in the tail are effectively non-polar.
  • SARAH: Why?
  • DAD: Because while carbon and hydrogen have almost the same electronegativity, oxygen is far more electronegative, thereby polarizing the C-O bonds.
  • SARAH: Why?
  • DAD: Why is oxygen more electronegative than carbon and hydrogen?
  • SARAH: Yes.
  • DAD: That’s complicated. There are different answers to that question, depending on whether you’re talking about the Pauling or Mulliken electronegativity scales. The Pauling scale is based on homo- versus heteronuclear bond strength differences, while the Mulliken scale is based on the atomic properties of electron affinity and ionization energy. But it really all comes down to effective nuclear charge. The valence electrons in an oxygen atom have a lower energy than those of a carbon atom, and electrons shared between them are held more tightly to the oxygen, because electrons in an oxygen atom experience a greater nuclear charge and therefore a stronger attraction to the atomic nucleus! Cool, huh?
  • (pause)
  • SARAH: I don’t get it.
  • DAD: That’s OK. Neither do most of my students.
  • (The Dad is Stephen McNeil, "an Assistant Professor of Chemistry at the University of British Columbia Okanagan in Kelowna, British Columbia.")
  • Sounds like my childhood.